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Sunday, June 12, 2016

Observing Flood Evidence in Montana

Riding up in the Northwest United States, you'll probably encounter Montana. You pretty much have to, since it's the fourth largest state, and it borders on three Canadian provinces. That squiggly border with Idaho that gives the top part of that state it's odd shape is partly based on land formations. Montana gets mighty cold (seems like the coldest area in the US many days in the winter is International Falls, but fortunately, it does get to have summer as well), but Montana's still a place to find cowboys doing ranch work. They can find some national parks, glaciers, and (of course) mountains.


Water gaps are puzzling and annoying to secular geologists, since they defy long-age explanations and affirm the Genesis Flood. Here are some examples.
Madison River flows through Bear Trap Canyon. Image credit: US Department of the Interior.
In those mountains are some of the many worldwide things called water gaps. According to uniformitarian geology, the land rose up at the same rate the water flowed, making it convenient for the water to carve through gneiss, and this happened in many places around the world. No, I don't believe it either. The best explanation is that water gaps and other unusual formations are the result of the Genesis Flood, and that the world is not as old as secularists want you to believe.
ICR’s Dr. Jake Hebert and I recently enjoyed a field trip around the town of Ennis, Montana, hosted by post-Flood Ice Age expert Michael Oard. During the outing we observed two landscape features best explained by Noah’s Flood.
. . . 
The Madison River’s waters originate in Yellowstone, flow northward through the picturesque Madison River Valley where Ennis lies, then produce rapids on their journey through Bear Trap Canyon. The river eventually merges with other waters near Three Forks, Montana, to form the Missouri River. Oddly, Bear Trap Canyon cuts right through a mountain range made of hard crystalline rock called gneiss. Why didn’t the Madison River flow around the mountain instead of cutting right through it? And did this little river carve the canyon over millions of years?

Geologists use the term water gaps for narrow canyons holding rivers that cut through mountain ranges. We don’t see them form today, so we rely on our forensic wits to solve these geologic mysteries. Every continent has water gaps, and thousands exist around the world. So, if we solve the mystery of one water gap, we might help solve a world of such mysteries.
To read the entire article, click on "Flood Evidence in Montana's Mountains". For additional information on water gaps and the Flood, click on "How Are Water Gaps Formed?"

Water gaps are puzzling and annoying to secular geologists, since they defy long-age explanations and affirm the Genesis Flood. Here are some examples.