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Sunday, August 21, 2016

Deplorable Denisovans Further Fluster Evolutionists

While advocates of scum-to-stalker evolution are still mourning over the loss of the Neanderthal as a transitional form (that bad boy was fully human), there are more packages aboard the Evolutionary Bad News Express. This time, it's the Denisovans. The Denisova Cave in Siberia's Altai Mountains yielded a few fragments, including a tooth. Scientists like teeth, because dentin (the stuff under tooth enamel) is very durable. Bones are nice, too.


Not much remains of the Denisovan people, but their genome reveals factors that are problematic for evolutionists. Much of what is found supports what biblical creationists expect.
Denisovan phalanx image credit: Thilo Parg / Wikimedia Commons License: CC BY-SA 3.0
Even thought the fragments are 41,000 years old in Darwinspeak, scientists were able to sequence the genome. I reckon they were pretty close to tears after what they found. Methylation —

"What's methylation?"

It comes from mint oil, and is used in ointments, cough remedies, to add flavor —

"That's menthol, you facetious —"

All right, all right, just quirting you a bit. 

Methylation has to do with epigentics and gene expression, as well as DNA repair and moving methyl group atoms around. Modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans are quite similar in the genome, yet evolutionists try to make the small variation in methylation into evidence that we all took different forks in the evolutionary trail. Like the Neanderthals, the Denisovans spread their DNA around. Traces of it are found in Tibetans, Pacific Islanders, and others. We have some of their DNA as well. Problems were found, which possibly contribute to our illnesses, and may have hastened the Denisovan demise.

There are several other important factors in the Denisovan genome that are what biblical creationists would expect to find, and cause evolutionists to go into rescuing device (excuses) mode.
A new chapter in the human origins debate opened in the year 2000 with the discovery of a new kind of archaic human called Denisova. Now not just the fossils are available to researchers but also DNA. Paleogenetics can now allegedly settle long-lasting questions due to the incompleteness of the fossil record, although DNA sequence veracity is a matter of concern among creationists.

Denisovans were discovered in the Upper Paleolithic layer 11.1 of Denisova Cave in southern Siberia, their remains consisting of, surprisingly, a distal manual phalanx and a molar tooth found at the same archaeological site from two individuals supposedly from the same population.

The Denisovan genome has been analyzed over the past few years, with sweeping claims of their cognitive capabilities, external appearance, and even detailed population dynamics. Based on such a small number of fossil remains, it is premature to draw too many robust scientific conclusions from the analysis of Denisova. Creation theory would predict that an archaic human would fit very well into the created human kind, as we shall see in the following.
To see what follows, click on "Denisovans menace evolution—a new chapter in the human origins debate".

Not much remains of the Denisovan people, but their genome reveals factors that are problematic for evolutionists. Much of what is found supports what biblical creationists expect.