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Sunday, June 11, 2017

Underground Agents of Regeneration

They work underground, seldom seen. There are many of them, and they are working to make our lives better. Sounds like a spy movie or something, but in this case, the underground is literal. We're talking about earthworms. Some folks only think of them when a robin yanks one out of the ground or someone uses them for fishing. Farmers have greater understanding and appreciation of them.

Credit: USAID (usage does not imply endorsement of site contents)
There are bunches of earthworms in the soil, and they are just doing worm stuff. They eat, burrow, poop — and their activity benefits the soil, therefore, benefits us as well. Since they eat waste and since billions of people do not have proper sanitation facilities, USAID has a project called Tiger Toilet to use the wrigglers in breaking down human waste products! Initial results are promising, with a benefit of comparative lack of odor. For more about this, click on "Testing the 'Tiger Toilet'" and "The Results Are In: Tiger Toilets Field Trial Findings".

In his wisdom, God gave us earthworms to help regenerate soil and break down waste, and we're using the creatures. Creepy evolutionists at Darwin's Ranch are stealing credit from God and giving worms credit for the ecology that led to the Cambrian Explosion. What are those ranch hands smoking, anyway?

Despite their size, earthworms are surprisingly helpful creatures. They occasionally venture above ground in broad daylight but are mostly night crawlers. They are best known for their underground habits, such as recycling organic waste, aerating soil, and helping organic matter to decompose.
Earthworms are detritivores—garbage eaters—the ultimate in dirt-digesting junk-food consumers. They eat almost anything—scraps of fruit, morsels of dead animal flesh, leaf litter, etc. As an earthy, underground version of “filter feeders,” they ingest whatever is buried and rotting in topsoil or within near-surface soil. Meadows and pastures are crawling with worms! Their numbers may reach above 300,000 per acre, especially in chalky clay soil. The aggregate weight of a dairy farm’s earthworms likely outweighs the total weight of livestock grazing above them.
To burrow into the rest, click on "Thank God for Earthworms!"
   
Our Creator has blessed us with crawly things. Earthworms are beneficial for soil and waste disposal as well as other ways of helping us.