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Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Light Receptors — Extraordinary Eye Engineering

What do you spy with your little eye? At the moment, a monitor of some sort with words and graphics on it. I spy the monitor with a compose screen and several open tabs on the browser, e-book reader, my Colt revolver, papers to file, a lamp, the window, a weird neighbor outside on the tree-lined sidewalk, and plenty more. We see many things throughout the day and take the entire process for granted. Our Creator has done a masterpiece of engineering so that we can convert photons of light into images that we can process in our minds. Was this a product of microbes-to-mule-skinner evolution? Not hardly!


We see many things throughout the day and take the entire process for granted. Our Creator has done a masterpiece of engineering so that we can convert photons of light into images that we can process in our minds.
Image from US National Institutes of Health
And don't let those uninformed anti-creationists tell you that the human eye is poorly designed, either. That nonsense has been debunked.

We have millions of photoreceptors in each eye to detect photons. A photon is exceptionally tiny, but if one photoreceptor misses it, there are plenty more to pick up on it. Lots of photons coming in, and our mind makes sense of it all.
Suppose you are an electronic engineer tasked with devising a mechanism that can translate ordinary variations of light into useful information. But here is the tricky part: It has to work inside a living person. Your engineering instincts instantly recognize the mechanism will require multiple parts—primarily a light detector and a data-processing center—working together for a single purpose.

You recall people have been sending messages to each other for centuries simply by flashing a light in a coded sequence. The people who send and receive these flashing messages must know “the code” in advance. However, light is simply a condition of nature—it is either present or it is not. It does not convey information or send instructions to organisms in and of itself. Processing data into useful information happens within the neurological center of an organism. Fortunately, the required data-processing element of the mechanism is already built into the person’s brain, saving you decades of work. All you have to do is devise a sensor to detect light and send that data to the brain. So, how would you begin your task?
You can clearly see the rest by clicking on "Made in His Image: Living Light Detectors Declare Design".