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Sunday, October 30, 2016

Blue Planet Mars

The pursuit of discovering life on Mars continues, and a key component of life is water. Mars is a red desert place with no water. Well, that was one view. Astronomers and people employed in the pseudoscience of astrobiology are still arguing about whether or not there's water. Some have said that it sorta kinda looks that way, but no, must not be water. I reckon part of the problem is that Mars has volcanoes (and one is mighty big) that could have belched out water vapor, but secularists say that oceans on Mars had to be there before the volcanoes. The materialistic view seem to go like this: if there's water on Mars, there may be life, which must have evolved, therefore, there is no Creator God.


There is some disagreement about whether or not Mars had, and still has, actual water. There is quite a bit of evidence, which also raises many questions.
Image credit (original on right, obviously): NASA / ESA / Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
Although it's good to see that a scientist or two wants to consider other possibilities than water for what has been documented, I can't help but wonder if the hesitation to agree with the abundant evidence is based on ideological grounds. That is, secular views are out of line with evidence. There's a great deal of evidence that Mars had water in the past, and there is probably some there now.
Did water once flow on the surface of another planet in the solar system? Although Mars is now a desert, we have growing evidence that rain and flash floods once scoured the surface, sustaining a network of streams and lakes—and perhaps even an ocean. Today it appears that some of this water is locked up in subsurface permafrost and the rest has escaped into space.

Where did all this liquid water come from, and why did it disappear? These are two of the greatest mysteries in planetary astronomy. Mars is currently too cold and its atmosphere is too thin to support liquid water. So how did it ever produce and sustain an ocean and a thick atmosphere?

The spacecraft and rovers sent to Mars over the past five years are equipped with next-generation instruments to help solve these very questions. Yet despite our ever-increasing knowledge of the Red Planet, investigators are still baffled.
To read the rest, click on "Mars—The Other Blue Planet?"

There is some disagreement about whether or not Mars had, and still has, actual water. There is quite a bit of evidence, which also raises many questions.