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Sunday, January 29, 2017

Mutations Not So Random After All

Papa Darwin's ideas require huge amounts of time, hence the bellicose propaganda of his disciples for an old Earth. However, another evolutionary concept involves chance and random mutations, but the overwhelming majority of mutations are harmful to an organism. Darwin was ignorant of the work of Mendel (peas be upon him) and did not know about mutations, his followers incorporated that idea later.) I'll allow that some mutations seem beneficial at first glance, but are usually disadvantageous in other ways.


In addition to long ages, evolution requires mutations. Random ones. Studies are showing that mutations can actually be targeted, which supports biblical creation science.
Image credit: Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Do mutations add genetic information, such as evolutionists insist? There are problems with that term, some of which are semantics, and a good part is how "information" is defined, so the answer may be a qualified "yes". What can prove to be frustrating to evolutionists is the way mutations may be a part of the Creator's design (which is borne out by rapid speciation), and scientific discoveries are inadvertently supporting predictions from biblical creation.
Evolutionists look at examples of animals adapting to their environments, and they assume that in this way, given enough time and enough tiny changes, primitive frogs have turned into turtles, and fish into philosophers.

Creationists have long agreed that inheritable adaptation happens via natural selection. This helps explain how the kinds represented on the Ark were able to rapidly diversify afterwards into many different varieties, even new species.

On its own, natural selection can only sort (or get rid of) existing information. It cannot generate any new information or variability itself; it can only choose from what is already there. Genes come in pairs, are reshuffled at reproduction, and many exist in at least two forms, so living things have a lot of built-in variability already. Thus the ‘dog kind’ pair on the Ark could have diversified rapidly into coyotes, dingoes, wolves, etc. without any genetic novelty necessarily introduced into their DNA.
To read the rest, click on "Designed to adapt?"



In addition to long ages, evolution requires mutations. Random ones. Studies are showing that mutations can actually be targeted, which supports biblical creation science.