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Sunday, October 01, 2017

Rewriting the Human Evolution Story — Again

The piffle of human evolution is becoming more risible with the passage of time. New members are hurridedly added to the ancestral parade with great fanfare, only to be quietly removed when sufficient data is collected. Darwinian mythology is presented as science, and timelines frequently need substantial revision, whether in human or other life forms. It happened again.


Source: The Passion of Creation, Leonid Pasternak, 1880s

Tools and tools were discovered that sent repercussions through the "out of Africa" scenario, both with the dating and location of our putative origins. One of the main problems with evolutionism is the presuppositions that control the story. 

Seems like they'd have themselves a confab and say, "This ain't happening. Mayhaps we should take a serious look at the true human history of creation as recorded in Genesis. After all, creationists don't have these problems!" Not likely, since they're committed to naturalism, and there is no room for the Creator in their historical fictions.
Evolutionary scientists recently announced that fossils from Jebel Irhoud in Morocco, dated at around 300,000 years old, are the oldest Homo sapiens fossils ever discovered. This claim is based on the shape of a skull and the presence of stone tools at the site. This represents a potential rewrite to the human evolution story that pushes back the origin of “modern” humans by 100,000 years. It would also suggest that the “cradle of civilization” included the entire African continent rather than just eastern Africa, as long claimed by evolutionists.
Even the pro-evolution magazine Scientific American acknowledged that these Moroccan fossils “mess up” the accepted human evolution story. Why?
To read the rest of their consternation, click on "The Ever-Evolving Human Evolution Story".

The story of human evolution needs to be rewritten again. This time, fossils and tools mess up the timeline and the alleged location of our ancestral origins.